Daniel Goleman: The Art of Moving On

We all experience disappointments at work. Passed over for a promotion. Argument with a client or colleague. Office politics run amok. As a leader, your colleagues may see you as the cause of their frustrations – justified or not. Regardless of the source of grief, these distractions can impact performance on all levels. How can you help your team get past emotional roadblocks?

I spoke with my colleague, George Kohlrieser, a professor at IMD about high performance leadership in my master class series. During our discussion, he offered ways to rebound from difficult emotions.

Bonding is crucial for any conflict management and negotiation

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Daniel Goleman: The Valuable Data in Your Gut

The best business decisions take into account all the numbers and facts on the table, and then something from beyond the table: the brain’s total understanding of a deal.

This requires that we tune into brain circuitry that manages our entire life wisdom on the subject. The tricky part: none of this circuitry connects to the part of the brain that thinks in words. It connects largely to the gastrointestinal tract.

Specifically, we need to sense our gut feeling.

A study done at USC found that when highly successful entrepreneurs make decisions, they gather information as widely as possible, then check it against their gut sense.»

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Daniel Goleman: Starting a New Career? Consider Good Work

One reason Ebola has broken out so dangerously in countries like Sierra Leone traces to local customs that inadvertently spread the disease. One of these is the burial tradition where relatives kiss the deceased as a sign of respect.

But then a native health worker explained to locals why that was now a bad idea, and they came up with a neat solution: plant a banana tree with the deceased, and kiss the bananas instead of the person.

This works well within the set of local beliefs and eliminates one vector of the epidemic.

That brilliant insight was the result of methods that native health worker learned by being trained in ACT, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

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Daniel Goleman: What are the Habits of a Systems Thinker?

Innate systems intelligence is present from our very early years. If nurtured, it can develop to surprising scope and depth in older students.

But the key to this progression is offering developmentally appropriate tools that enable students to articulate and hone their systems intelligence – whether through simple visual tools like a reinforcing feedback loop or software to build dynamic simulation models.

There is a natural interplay between tools and skills. As the old saying goes, “You need hammers to build houses but also to build carpenters.” Without usable tools, this innate systems intelligence lays fallow, much like our innate musical intelligence would if children were never given musical instruments.»

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Daniel Goleman: How to Hear Your Inner Voice

After being diagnosed with the liver cancer that was to take his life a few years later, Steve Jobs gave a heartfelt talk to a graduating class at Stanford University. His advice: “Don’t let the voice of others’ opinions drown out your inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become.” But how do you hear “your inner voice,” that your heart and intuition somehow already know?

You need to depend on your body’s signals.

Monitoring of our internal organs is done by the insula, tucked behind the frontal lobes of the brain.»

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Daniel Goleman: Why We Need Caring Classrooms

More educators are recognizing that compassion can be taught. But I don’t think it’s enough to have children just learn about compassion, because we need to embody our ethical beliefs by acting on them. This begins with empathy.

There are three main kinds of empathy, each involving distinct sets of brain circuits.

1: Cognitive empathy: understanding how other people see the world and how they think about it. This lets us put what we have to say in ways the other person will best comprehend.

2. Emotional empathy: a brain-to-brain linkage that gives us an instant inner sense of how the other person feels – sensing their emotions from moment to moment.»

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Daniel Goleman: The Case for Teaching Emotional Literacy in Schools

Self-Awareness Training

The children coming into their second grade classroom that morning arranged their chairs in a circle for a daily ritual: Their teacher asked every child to tell the class how they felt (unless they didn’t want to share this), and why they felt that way.

This simple exercise in a New Haven, CT elementary school was the first time I saw a lesson in emotional literacy.

Naming emotions accurately helps children be clearer about what is going on inside – essential both to making clearheaded decisions and to managing emotions throughout life.

Self-awareness – turning our attention to our inner world of thoughts and feelings – allows us to manage ourselves well.»

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Daniel Goleman: It’s Not IQ Part 2: Use the Triple Focus Approach to Education

Don’t tell the kids – or maybe we should.

There’s no doubt that IQ and motivation predict good grades. But when you enter the working world, IQ plays a different role: it sorts people into the jobs they can hold. Stellar work in school pays off in getting intellectually challenging jobs.

But once you are in a given job – say a manager – you are competing with people as smart as you. That’s when IQ loses its power to predict success, which starts to depend more on “non-cognitive” factors like persistence in pursuing your goals or social intelligence.

That paradox about IQ and success came as a revelation to me when I started to examine competence models, the studies done by companies themselves to identify the abilities that set their star performers apart from the average ones.»

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Daniel Goleman: How to Hire the Right Candidate

In response to last week’s article, “What Predicts Success? It’s Not Your IQ,” a commenter asked: “How can we better gauge emotional intelligence competencies while interviewing potential candidates?”

Who better to answer this question than my colleague and Leadership: A Master Class participant, Claudio Fernández-Aráoz. According to Claudio, the interview process should be the same whether you’re evaluating an external candidate for an open position or a colleague keen for promotion. You need to use the right assessment techniques and involve the right number of highly qualified and properly motivated interviewers.

What are the right assessment techniques?

Solid assessments require a combination of well-structured behavioral interviews and proper reference checks.»

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How to Hire the Right Candidate

In response to last week’s article, “What Predicts Success? It’s Not Your IQ,” a commenter asked: “How can we better gauge emotional intelligence competencies while interviewing potential candidates?”

Who better to answer this question than my colleague and Leadership: A Master Class participant, Claudio Fernández-Aráoz. According to Claudio, the interview process should be the same whether you’re evaluating an external candidate for an open position or a colleague keen for promotion. You need to use the right assessment techniques and involve the right number of highly qualified and properly motivated interviewers.

What are the right assessment techniques?

Solid assessments require a combination of well-structured behavioral interviews and proper reference checks.»

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