Daniel Goleman: What Predicts Success? It's Not Your IQ

The CEO of one of the world’s largest money management firms was puzzled. He wanted to know why there was a Bell curve for performance among his employees, with a few outstanding, most in the middle, and a few poor. After all, he hired only the best and brightest graduates from the top schools – shouldn’t they all be outstanding?

That same puzzle was explored in Malcolm Gladwell’s bestseller David and Goliath, which I recently read. Malcolm was befuddled by the finding that many of those in the mid to low achievement spectrum of Ivy League schools did not turn out to be world leaders – despite their SAT scores being higher than even the best students at the so-so colleges, who fared better.»

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What Predicts Success? It's Not Your IQ

The CEO of one of the world’s largest money management firms was puzzled. He wanted to know why there was a Bell curve for performance among his employees, with a few outstanding, most in the middle, and a few poor. After all, he hired only the best and brightest graduates from the top schools – shouldn’t they all be outstanding?

That same puzzle was explored in Malcolm Gladwell’s bestseller David and Goliath, which I recently read. Malcolm was befuddled by the finding that many of those in the mid to low achievement spectrum of Ivy League schools did not turn out to be world leaders – despite their SAT scores being higher than even the best students at the so-so colleges, who fared better.»

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Daniel Goleman: Know Your Stress Type

NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health conducted a nationwide poll in March and early April to find common sources of stress.

They surveyed more than 2,500 adults across the US, finding that the usual culprits topped the list: too many responsibilities, finances, and work issues. Personal health difficulties, as well as health problems in the family were also commonly cited.

One aspect of the study that caught my attention was how stress affects people’s behavior, particularly in areas that can negatively impact health. People who reported a great deal of stress in the previous month cited difficulty sleeping.»

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Know Your Stress Type

NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health conducted a nationwide poll in March and early April to find common sources of stress.

They surveyed more than 2,500 adults across the US, finding that the usual culprits topped the list: too many responsibilities, finances, and work issues. Personal health difficulties, as well as health problems in the family were also commonly cited.

One aspect of the study that caught my attention was how stress affects people’s behavior, particularly in areas that can negatively impact health. People who reported a great deal of stress in the previous month cited difficulty sleeping.»

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Daniel Goleman: Eight Must-Have Competencies for Future Leaders

Leaders tomorrow will succeed with a different skill set than that of today’s best. Smart leaders will spot the mid-career folks with greatest potential to become those outstanding future executives. And wise organizations will make this a high priority mission.

But what will tomorrow’s leadership take?

In the June Harvard Business Review hiring guru Claudio Fernández-Aráoz says to spot those with high leadership potential look for four abilities: Openness and curiosity; recognition of new possibilities; persuasion and an unstoppable drive.

But those are not enough. While leaders tomorrow will need these capacities to adapt to a turbulent world, the fundamentals of leadership will not change.»

Read More

Eight Must-Have Competencies for Future Leaders

Leaders tomorrow will succeed with a different skill set than that of today’s best. Smart leaders will spot the mid-career folks with greatest potential to become those outstanding future executives. And wise organizations will make this a high priority mission.

But what will tomorrow’s leadership take?

In the June Harvard Business Review hiring guru Claudio Fernández-Aráoz says to spot those with high leadership potential look for four abilities: Openness and curiosity; recognition of new possibilities; persuasion and an unstoppable drive.

But those are not enough. While leaders tomorrow will need these capacities to adapt to a turbulent world, the fundamentals of leadership will not change.»

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Daniel Goleman: Leader Spotting: The Four Essential Talents

What do you look for in tomorrow’s leaders? That question is crucial for the long-term health of any organization.

The only certainty about tomorrow’s business reality is that it will be “VUCA”: volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. As the world changes, so do the abilities leaders will need. Yet there is a specific skill set that will match the demands of such a reality.

The hallmarks of these potential leaders are pinpointed by my friend and colleague, Claudio Fernández-Aráoz in 21 Century Talent Spotting,” the cover article of this month’s Harvard Business Review. Claudio, formerly director of research at the executive search firm Egon Zehnder International, has become the global guru on hiring, so his wisdom is all the more welcome.»

Read More

Leader Spotting: The Four Essential Talents

What do you look for in tomorrow’s leaders? That question is crucial for the long-term health of any organization.

The only certainty about tomorrow’s business reality is that it will be “VUCA”: volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. As the world changes, so do the abilities leaders will need. Yet there is a specific skill set that will match the demands of such a reality.

The hallmarks of these potential leaders are pinpointed by my friend and colleague, Claudio Fernández-Aráoz in 21 Century Talent Spotting,” the cover article of this month’s Harvard Business Review. Claudio, formerly director of research at the executive search firm Egon Zehnder International, has become the global guru on hiring, so his wisdom is all the more welcome.»

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Daniel Goleman: Be Mindful of the Emotions You Leave Behind

Whenever a meeting threatened to lapse into malaise, the president of a company would suddenly launch into a critique of someone at the table who could take it (usually the marketing director, who was his best friend). Then he would swiftly move on, having riveted the attention of everyone in the room. That tactic invariably revived the group’s failing focus with keen interest. He was herding those in attendance from boredom to engagement.

Displays of a leader’s displeasure make use of emotional contagion. If artfully calibrated, even a burst of pique can stir followers enough to capture their attention and motivate them.»

Read More

Be Mindful of the Emotions You Leave Behind

Whenever a meeting threatened to lapse into malaise, the president of a company would suddenly launch into a critique of someone at the table who could take it (usually the marketing director, who was his best friend). Then he would swiftly move on, having riveted the attention of everyone in the room. That tactic invariably revived the group’s failing focus with keen interest. He was herding those in attendance from boredom to engagement.

Displays of a leader’s displeasure make use of emotional contagion. If artfully calibrated, even a burst of pique can stir followers enough to capture their attention and motivate them.»

Read More