Daniel Goleman: The Case for Teaching Emotional Literacy in Schools

Self-Awareness Training

The children coming into their second grade classroom that morning arranged their chairs in a circle for a daily ritual: Their teacher asked every child to tell the class how they felt (unless they didn’t want to share this), and why they felt that way.

This simple exercise in a New Haven, CT elementary school was the first time I saw a lesson in emotional literacy.

Naming emotions accurately helps children be clearer about what is going on inside – essential both to making clearheaded decisions and to managing emotions throughout life.

Self-awareness – turning our attention to our inner world of thoughts and feelings – allows us to manage ourselves well.»

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Daniel Goleman: It’s Not IQ Part 2: Use the Triple Focus Approach to Education

Don’t tell the kids – or maybe we should.

There’s no doubt that IQ and motivation predict good grades. But when you enter the working world, IQ plays a different role: it sorts people into the jobs they can hold. Stellar work in school pays off in getting intellectually challenging jobs.

But once you are in a given job – say a manager – you are competing with people as smart as you. That’s when IQ loses its power to predict success, which starts to depend more on “non-cognitive” factors like persistence in pursuing your goals or social intelligence.

That paradox about IQ and success came as a revelation to me when I started to examine competence models, the studies done by companies themselves to identify the abilities that set their star performers apart from the average ones.»

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How to Hire the Right Candidate

In response to last week’s article, “What Predicts Success? It’s Not Your IQ,” a commenter asked: “How can we better gauge emotional intelligence competencies while interviewing potential candidates?”

Who better to answer this question than my colleague and Leadership: A Master Class participant, Claudio Fernández-Aráoz. According to Claudio, the interview process should be the same whether you’re evaluating an external candidate for an open position or a colleague keen for promotion. You need to use the right assessment techniques and involve the right number of highly qualified and properly motivated interviewers.

What are the right assessment techniques?

Solid assessments require a combination of well-structured behavioral interviews and proper reference checks.»

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Daniel Goleman: How to Hire the Right Candidate

In response to last week’s article, “What Predicts Success? It’s Not Your IQ,” a commenter asked: “How can we better gauge emotional intelligence competencies while interviewing potential candidates?”

Who better to answer this question than my colleague and Leadership: A Master Class participant, Claudio Fernández-Aráoz. According to Claudio, the interview process should be the same whether you’re evaluating an external candidate for an open position or a colleague keen for promotion. You need to use the right assessment techniques and involve the right number of highly qualified and properly motivated interviewers.

What are the right assessment techniques?

Solid assessments require a combination of well-structured behavioral interviews and proper reference checks.»

Read More

What Predicts Success? It's Not Your IQ

The CEO of one of the world’s largest money management firms was puzzled. He wanted to know why there was a Bell curve for performance among his employees, with a few outstanding, most in the middle, and a few poor. After all, he hired only the best and brightest graduates from the top schools – shouldn’t they all be outstanding?

That same puzzle was explored in Malcolm Gladwell’s bestseller David and Goliath, which I recently read. Malcolm was befuddled by the finding that many of those in the mid to low achievement spectrum of Ivy League schools did not turn out to be world leaders – despite their SAT scores being higher than even the best students at the so-so colleges, who fared better.»

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Daniel Goleman: What Predicts Success? It's Not Your IQ

The CEO of one of the world’s largest money management firms was puzzled. He wanted to know why there was a Bell curve for performance among his employees, with a few outstanding, most in the middle, and a few poor. After all, he hired only the best and brightest graduates from the top schools – shouldn’t they all be outstanding?

That same puzzle was explored in Malcolm Gladwell’s bestseller David and Goliath, which I recently read. Malcolm was befuddled by the finding that many of those in the mid to low achievement spectrum of Ivy League schools did not turn out to be world leaders – despite their SAT scores being higher than even the best students at the so-so colleges, who fared better.»

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Know Your Stress Type

NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health conducted a nationwide poll in March and early April to find common sources of stress.

They surveyed more than 2,500 adults across the US, finding that the usual culprits topped the list: too many responsibilities, finances, and work issues. Personal health difficulties, as well as health problems in the family were also commonly cited.

One aspect of the study that caught my attention was how stress affects people’s behavior, particularly in areas that can negatively impact health. People who reported a great deal of stress in the previous month cited difficulty sleeping.»

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Daniel Goleman: Know Your Stress Type

NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health conducted a nationwide poll in March and early April to find common sources of stress.

They surveyed more than 2,500 adults across the US, finding that the usual culprits topped the list: too many responsibilities, finances, and work issues. Personal health difficulties, as well as health problems in the family were also commonly cited.

One aspect of the study that caught my attention was how stress affects people’s behavior, particularly in areas that can negatively impact health. People who reported a great deal of stress in the previous month cited difficulty sleeping.»

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Eight Must-Have Competencies for Future Leaders

Leaders tomorrow will succeed with a different skill set than that of today’s best. Smart leaders will spot the mid-career folks with greatest potential to become those outstanding future executives. And wise organizations will make this a high priority mission.

But what will tomorrow’s leadership take?

In the June Harvard Business Review hiring guru Claudio Fernández-Aráoz says to spot those with high leadership potential look for four abilities: Openness and curiosity; recognition of new possibilities; persuasion and an unstoppable drive.

But those are not enough. While leaders tomorrow will need these capacities to adapt to a turbulent world, the fundamentals of leadership will not change.»

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Daniel Goleman: Eight Must-Have Competencies for Future Leaders

Leaders tomorrow will succeed with a different skill set than that of today’s best. Smart leaders will spot the mid-career folks with greatest potential to become those outstanding future executives. And wise organizations will make this a high priority mission.

But what will tomorrow’s leadership take?

In the June Harvard Business Review hiring guru Claudio Fernández-Aráoz says to spot those with high leadership potential look for four abilities: Openness and curiosity; recognition of new possibilities; persuasion and an unstoppable drive.

But those are not enough. While leaders tomorrow will need these capacities to adapt to a turbulent world, the fundamentals of leadership will not change.»

Read More